27 Charts of Leadership Communication Styles Around the World

Earlier this week I shared a great infographic about differences in global leadership (24 Charts of Leadership Styles). It used the amazing work of Richard Lewis and his work on global leadership and culture. Today’s content is a follow-up infographic from Mr. Lewis. It focuses on differences in global communication styles.

As a Canadian who lives in America and occasionally teaches in Europe, I have had my share of communication mishaps. I have learned that the need to develop cultural agility is a critical skill for 21st century leaders. Take a look below and see if you have experienced any of these differences. Or more importantly, assess how others view you!

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Interested in learning more about global leadership? You may enjoy some of my past posts about leadership norms around the word: Gender EqualityAssertivenessFuture Orientation, Power DistancePerformance Orientation, Human Orientation and Individualism

When Cultures Collide by Richard Lewis is available for purchase on Amazon.


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Jeff Suderman is a futurist, consultant, and professor who works in the field of organizational development. He partners with clients to improve culture, leadership, teamwork, organizational alignment, strategy and organizational future-readiness. He resides in Palm Desert, California. Twitter: @jlsuderman Email: jeff@jeffsuderman.com

24 Charts of Leadership Styles Around the World

Today’s content was originally posted by my colleague Paul Sohn. It contains a fantastic overview about global leadership styles and he graciously allowed me to recycle it for your enjoyment. 

I had only been in Lithuania for an hour when a store-clerk looked me in the eye, shook her finger under my nose and forcefully said, “No! No! No!” in broken English. This unusual experience quickly taught me that things work differently in Lithuania! From a legal perspective, I learned that you cannot buy beer at the grocery store after 10 p.m.! This brusque statement was an actually an act of someone doing her job! From a leadership perspective, I learned that blunt and forceful communication is a norm when you are working with someone who grew up in Lithuania during the Soviet occupation.

We encounter vastly different leadership situations depending which patch of earth we stand on. The following infographic provide 24 insightful ways to understand leadership differences across the globe. They were developed by Richard D. Lewis in his book When Cultures Collide.

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Interested in more about differences about global leadership? Later this week I will post part II (another infographic) which provides valuable insights about cross-cultural communication. In the meantime, you may enjoy some of my past posts about leadership differences around the word: Gender EqualityAssertivenessFuture Orientation, Power DistancePerformance Orientation, Human Orientation and Individualism

When Cultures Collide is available for purchase on Amazon. You may also be interested in Paul Sohn’s recent book, Quarter-Life Calling: How to Find Your Sweet Spot in Your Twenties.


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Jeff Suderman is a futurist, consultant, and professor who works in the field of organizational development. He partners with clients to improve culture, leadership, teamwork, organizational alignment, strategy and organizational future-readiness. He resides in Palm Desert, California. Twitter: @jlsuderman Email: jeff@jeffsuderman.com

Gen Z Part II: 10 Facts and 5 Organizational Implications

Last week’s post about Gen Z generated a lot of traffic and follow up content (see Gen Z Just Graduated from College Infographic). As a result, I have developed an unplanned Part II as today’s post. The following content has been gleaned from a study by Universum of 55,000 high school students and recent high school graduates in 46 countries.

Ten Facts

  1. Gen Z’s will eventually total 60 million people.
  2. In a single day, Gen Z’s will often multi-task across a handful of screens, expecting “seamless integration.
  3. Due to their immersion in technology since birth, Gen Z workers may (ironically) be more focused and directed when it comes to technology than previous generations.
  4. Expect Gen Z to be more realistic about career opportunities, yet more idealistic about their employers’ social profiles.
  5. Gen Z’s will demand a diverse set of digital tools, both offered by the company and publicly accessible.
  6. With Generation Z there is less social media about oneself and more about the community (Colleen Broomall).
  7. Gen Z’s appear more savvy than Millennials regarding technology and work process.
  8. Fully 77% of Gen Z’s indicate they expect to work harder than previous (Robert Half).
  9. About 53%of Gen Z workers would rather communicate face-to-face than through instant message or videoconference.
  10. More than half of them want to start their own company. This entrepreneurial spirit exceeds that of Millennials

Five Organizational Implications

  1. Entrepreneurism is in their DNA, and workplace dynamics must support that independent streak.
  2. This generation’s is comfortable with physical mobility and mobile tools. As a result, they will create office spaces or zones which offer a variety of ways to digitally work and interact — collaboratively, individually, and socially.
  3. They are seeking a work environment where there is a lot of open dialogue, the way Netflix is run, where it’s a team effort (Colleen Broomall).
  4. Gen Z’s value their reputation and personal brand. As a result, this generation will value privacy in the workplace and demand employers respond accordingly.
  5. IT departments that invest in self-teaching tools will profit. Gen Z is adept at learning how to use applications through watching YouTube-style training videos and studying self-paced online modules.

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Jeff Suderman is a futurist, consultant, Gen X’er and professor who works in the field of organizational development. He partners with clients to improve culture, leadership, teamwork, organizational alignment, strategy and organizational future-readiness. He resides in Palm Desert, California. Twitter: @jlsuderman Email: jeff@jeffsuderman.com

Sources: BMC.

Image Credit: Eduventures

 

[Infographic] Gen Z Just Graduated from College! So What Are They Like?

Over the past year two of my students have taught me a lot as they have undertaken thesis work related to generational differences in the workplace. A few of my blogs have addressed this theme in recent months (The Millennial Way and Defining Workplace Generations). Today I am continuing this topic by discussing a generation that has not received as much press as it should. But Gen Z is about to get a lot of attention!

You see, we have just entered the zone where Gen Z’s are graduating from college. Most demographers define this generation as those born between 1995 and 2010 which means that the first wave of this cohort just graduated. You can expect to see many of their applications and resumes in the months ahead. And as we have learned with previous generations, they will bring some changes!

The content below is courtesy of Richard Madison, a marketer at the Brighton School of Business (U.K). It provides some very practical insights about Gen Z. I trust it will help your organization prepare for yet another wave of unique expectations in our increasingly multigenerational work environments.

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Jeff Suderman is a futurist, consultant, Gen X’er and professor who works in the field of organizational development. He partners with clients to improve culture, leadership, teamwork, organizational alignment, strategy and organizational future-readiness. He resides in Palm Desert, California. Twitter: @jlsuderman Email: jeff@jeffsuderman.com

Source: Brighton School of Business and Management