3 Things I Learned About Leadership At My Golf Lesson

At a recent golf tournament, my goodie bag had a coupon for a free golf lesson. If you’ve watched me play, you would strongly recommend that I use the coupon! This week I took Mike up on his offer and spent an hour with him on the driving range. As often happens, I was amazed by the parallels between what I learned as a golfer and the leadership principles that I use with clients. So, as you prepare to unplug and relax over the Christmas holidays, allow me to share three leadership lessons that Mike taught me while swinging a piece of metal at a little white ball.

  1. You don’t know what you don’t know. My lesson was enabled by incredible technology. A video camera, a computer and a swing analyzer tablet recorded and analyzed what happened when I swing a club (called ‘Trackman’ for you curious readers). After hitting 12 balls (and far too much turf) Mike told me that he had seen enough and we sat in front of the computer. He then introduced me to about 25 different metrics of my swing. There were terms I had never heard of like smash factor, spin rate and attack angle. But more importantly, Mike also told me that we were only going to focus on 2 of these 25 metrics because they were the most important fixes that would improve my game.

Leadership Application: Are you brave enough to admit that you don’t know? We all have blind spots – in fact, research tells us that you have an average of 3.4! It takes humility to admit you don’t know a lot of things? Are you actively working to lower your leadership handicap by trying to know more about what you don’t know?

  1. Multiple perspectives give perspective. Being able to observe my swing on video from two different angles gave me a perspective on my golf game that I’ve never had. Mike’s on-screen swing diagrams gave me a baseline to measure against. Now when I swing my club, I can visualize my posture, my club angle and work to avoid my turf-digging hip slide. I can’t tell you how many little things I have attempted to teach myself over the years as I have worked to improve my game (watch the elbow, check the stance, are my wrists open or closed…). I suspect that many of them helped. However, in retrospect, they were a lot of little things. In contrast, a lesson with a knowledgeable coach provided me with the big picture. Now I know what to work on first (and it’s not my elbow!).

Leadership Application: Few of us are good at asking for help and I praise those of you who do so! While you can improve your leadership game on your own over time, your perspective is based on your own personal insights. And some of them are not even correct! An outside perspective (or several) will provide you with a different look at your leadership. Others can help you differentiate between the little things and the big things. Do you intentionally get perspective on your leadership from others?golf-swing-2

  1. Practice. Practice. Practice. I only got to hit the ball for about 15% of my golf lesson. The rest of our time was spent watching my swing on video, learning how to balance my posture and swinging my upside-down club at a giant beanbag. I’ll be honest, it wasn’t nearly as sexy as I had hoped. However, Mike’s coaching reminded me that playing the game well is a byproduct of a lot of practice. In fact, by the time we were done the lesson Mike had me hitting 130 yard shots with one hand! Just imagine what will happen with practice.

Leadership Application: Whether it is taking time for education, being a voracious reader of asking a lot of questions, your leadership success is also contingent on practice. What are you doing to practice and improve your leadership game?

To conclude, I’ll also offer a plug for Michael Maggs – he is very good at what he does. If you’re in the desert and you need some coaching to help you get rid of your slice or add a few extra yards send him an email and tell him Jeff sent you (mike@maggsgolf.com or his website). Merry Christmas!


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Dr. Jeff Suderman is a futurist, consultant, and professor who works in the field of organizational development. He partners with clients to improve culture, leadership, teamwork, organizational alignment, strategy and organizational future-readiness. He resides in Palm Desert, California. Twitter: @jlsuderman Email: jeff@jeffsuderman.com

Cover Photo: Jeff Suderman (PGA West TPC, La Quinta, CA)

The Future of Sports – 19 Trends

Today’s blog provides several fascinating insights about the future of sports developed by the Shaping Tomorrow organization. You will find that these upcoming changes are rooted in several key drivers which include shifting demographics (Gen Y), technology invading markets which are not traditionally linked to tech (like sports) as well significant shifts in the economic priority of consumers. So, without further adieu, here they are.

  1. Broadcasts of virtual reality (VR) sports could become the norm.
  2. An estimated 27% of U.S public high schools will not be offering any sports programs by 2020.
  3. E-skin displays could become a direct competition or a replacement for sport watches.
  4. eSports revenues could surpass $1 billion as early as 2018. One Activision exec says it’s a potential Olympic sport.
  5. In the U.S there are more eSports fans than baseball fans and it’s predicted it will exceed any other sport in US.
  6. Millennials are projected to spend about half what all adults in the US and Canada spend ($50) on live sporting events.
  7. Adding sensors to sports equipment will continue to revolutionize the way athletes train and compete.
  8. Body sensor shipments are expected to increase from 2.7 million in 2015 to 68.0 million units annually by 2021.
  9. Parents will increasingly want sports equipment that helps protect their children from injury.
  10. Whoop is the first scientifically-grounded system designed for continuous wear that provides athletes with data to reduce injuries and predict peak performance.
  11. The activewear industry is expected to add $83 billion in sales globally by 2020.
  12. Demand will grow for products and services that help prevent or rehabilitate injuries in growing bodies.
  13. Sports-science insiders have predicted the imminent arrival of gene doping in sports.
  14. Annual smart clothing shipments will grow from 968,000 units in 2015 to 24.8 million units in 2021.
  15. By 2020, global shipments of VR headsets are expected to hit 64.8 million per year.
  16. A new app developed by Scottish start-up Sansible Wearables will let players and coaches track the intensity of a collision and the effect it has on the body.
  17. Similarly, a mouthguard with motion sensors can analyse concussion risks after a player contact.
  18. Rugby could find itself alongside American football as a sport fast losing support among a new generation of parents and young families.
  19. Intelligent robots will publish sports commentaries.

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Jeff Suderman is a futurist, consultant, and professor who works in the field of organizational development. He partners with clients to improve culture, leadership, teamwork, organizational alignment, strategy and organizational future-readiness. He resides in Palm Desert, California. Twitter: @jlsuderman Email: jeff@jeffsuderman.com

Source: Shaping Tomorrow
Photo Credit: Bob Smith

 

Leadership Lessons: Emotional Intelligence 101

During a meeting with a prospective client this week I was asked how I identify leadership potential. There are many good answers to this question, but to my surprise, I quickly blurted out “self-awareness” before I had even given the question thoughtful consideration.

Socrates is reputed to have once taught his students a simple lesson – “Know thyself”. This theme lies behind the principle of self-awareness. Self-aware people know what they are good at. More importantly, they know what they are not good at (and surround themselves with people who are good at these things!). People who lack self-awareness think they are good at tasks they do not excel at. As a result, they often repeat mistakes and cover up deficiencies.

My best employees have consistently been self-aware people. Conversely, those who have caused me the greatest frustration usually do not ‘know thyself’ very well! This is why I am a fan of the concept of emotional intelligence. It is a principle which reminds us that effective leadership can be learned and is not reserved for those born with the right skills. The infographic below is sourced from Davitt Coroporate Partners and provides a great introduction to emotional intelligence. Developing emotional intelligence is a great way to get to ‘know thyself’ better and increase your leadership capacity.

emotional-intelligence-what-you-need-to-know-infographic

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Head ShotJeff Suderman is a futurist, consultant, and professor who works in the field of organizational development. He partners with clients to improve culture, leadership, teamwork, organizational alignment, strategy and organizational future-readiness. He resides in Palm Desert, California. Twitter: @jlsuderman Email: jeff@jeffsuderman.com

Infographic Credit: Davitt Corporate Partners