[Infographic] Gen Z Just Graduated from College! So What Are They Like?

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Over the past year two of my students have taught me a lot as they have undertaken thesis work related to generational differences in the workplace. A few of my blogs have addressed this theme in recent months (The Millennial Way and Defining Workplace Generations). Today I am continuing this topic by discussing a generation that has not received as much press as it should. But Gen Z is about to get a lot of attention!

You see, we have just entered the zone where Gen Z’s are graduating from college. Most demographers define this generation as those born between 1995 and 2010 which means that the first wave of this cohort just graduated. You can expect to see many of their applications and resumes in the months ahead. And as we have learned with previous generations, they will bring some changes!

The content below is courtesy of Richard Madison, a marketer at the Brighton School of Business (U.K). It provides some very practical insights about Gen Z. I trust it will help your organization prepare for yet another wave of unique expectations in our increasingly multigenerational work environments.

What-to-Expect-from-Gen-Z-Infographic

 

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Jeff Suderman is a futurist, consultant, Gen X’er and professor who works in the field of organizational development. He partners with clients to improve culture, leadership, teamwork, organizational alignment, strategy and organizational future-readiness. He resides in Palm Desert, California. Twitter: @jlsuderman Email: jeff@jeffsuderman.com

Source: Brighton School of Business and Management

10 comments

  1. Rich

    Very insightful, Dr. Suderman! Do you see any variables between Gen Zers in the UK and those in the USA? And what will the next generation be titled?

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    • Jeff Suderman

      Thanks for your comments Rich. The research sources used for this infographic are US-based so this is an accurate representation of the US market. The early moniker for the generation to follow Gen Z seems to be Alpha Gen (or Gen Alpha). See http://jeffsuderman.com/defining-workplace-generations-infographic for more details.

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  2. Mike Henry

    Interesting how large of a gap there is between “62% would rather start their own companies than work for one” and “3% currently run their own business”.

    I wonder if there’s a lack of training or teaching in how to actually start your own company within university education? It seems like those skills ought to be an important part of some/most programs.

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    • Jeff Suderman

      You’re sounding like Elon Musk…

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  3. Aiste K

    Dan Shawbel sates that Gen Y tends “to be more realistic instead of optimistic”. Yet 1 in 3 hopes to be a manager in 5 years, 1 in 3 also plans to retire by 60; 6 in 10 want to impact the world & more than 6 in 10 want to run their own businesses… If it’s not optimistic, then it’s at least very determined for sure. Intriguing insights overall, thanks!

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    • Aiste K

      Gen Z, not Gen Y 🙂

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      • Jeff Suderman

        Great observations Aiste!

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  4. Marta Boyle

    This is indeed fascinating. I wonder more and more how Gen X and Gen Z will affect those in the Gen X and Baby Boomer generations, and what sort of policies they will create as they assume leadership both here in the US and abroad.

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  5. Aiste K

    Pleasant coincidence – a similar research has just been conveyed in Lithuania (by AIESEC in collaboration with the United Nations). Similarly to the above data, it showed that salary isn’t a key determinant when choosing a job. Although it does become loyalty determining criteria once the experience is gained. Lithuanians also want to impact the world and emphasize the importance of volunteering as well as creativity generating activities. On the other hand, even 44.4% doubt that their current studies will be related to their future careers! Which can of course be explained by the fact that gap years after school is merely a slowly emerging trend and most of the undergraduates enter universities under traditional social pressures, ‘by default’ (ref.: http://m.alfa.lt/straipsnis/50022057/ )

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    • Jeff Suderman

      Thanks so much for contributing Aiste!

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