The Class of 2021 – 30 Things You Need To Know

Each fall, I provide Beloit College’s overview about the incoming class of college freshmen. This year’s list is a bit different for me as these attributes reflect the mindsets of students born in 1999. This is the birth year of our firstborn son who began his Computer Science program last week. So if you are getting to be an old guy like me, today’s blog may be more than just facts!

I have edited Beloit’s list to 30 items. The complete list can be accessed at the link above.

  1. Their classmates could include Eddie Murphy’s Zola and Mel Gibson’s Tommy, or Jackie Evancho singing down the hall.
  2. They are the last class to be born in the 1900s, the last of the Millennials —  enter next year, on cue, Generation Z! (though this may be disputed by some who would state that Gen Z began graduating from University last spring).
  3. They are the first generation for whom a “phone” has been primarily a video game, direction finder, electronic telegraph, and research library.
  4. Electronic signatures have always been as legally binding as the pen-on-paper kind.
  5. In college, they will often think of themselves as consumers, who’ve borrowed a lot of money to be there.
  6. Peanutscomic strips have always been repeats.
  7. They have largely grown up in a floppy-less world.
  8. There have always been emojis to cheer us up.
  9. It is doubtful that they have ever used or heard the high-pitched whine of a dial-up modem.
  10. They are the first generation to grow up with Watson outperforming Sherlock.
  11. Amazon has always invited consumers to follow the arrow from A to Z.
  12. Their folks have always been able to get reward points by paying their taxes to the IRS on plastic.
  13. In their lifetimes, Blackberryhas gone from being a wild fruit to being a communications device to becoming a wild fruit again.
  14. They have always been searching for Pokemon.
  15. Dora the Explorerand her pet monkey Boots helped to set them on the course of discovery.
  16. By the time they entered school, laptops were outselling desktops.
  17. Once on campus, they will find that college syllabi, replete with policies about disability, non-discrimination, and learning goals, might be longer than some of their reading assignments.
  18. As toddlers they may have dined on some of that canned food hoarded in case of Y2K.
  19. Whatever the subject, there’s always been a blog for it.
  20. Globalization has always been both a powerful fact of life and a source of incessant protest.
  21. One out of four major league baseball players has always been born outside the United States.
  22. A movie scene longer than two minutes has always seemed like an eternity.
  23. The Latin music industry has always had its own Grammy Awards.
  24. As toddlers, they may have taught their grandparents how to Skype.
  25. The BBC has always had a network in the U.S. where they speak American.
  26. There has always been a Monster in their corner when looking for a job.
  27. Wikipedia has steadily gained acceptance by their teachers.
  28. Justin Timberlake has always been a solo act.
  29. Women have always scaled both sides of Everest and rowed across the Atlantic.
  30. Bill Clinton has always been Hillary Clinton’s aging husband.

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Jeff Suderman is a futurist, consultant, and professor who works in the field of organizational development. He partners with clients to improve culture, leadership, teamwork, organizational alignment, strategy and organizational future-readiness. He resides in Palm Desert, California. Twitter: @jlsuderman Email: jeff@jeffsuderman.com

 

Source: Beloit

 

17 Global Population Trends You Probably Don’t Know

Population.

When was the last time you thoughtfully considered the powerful force of something as simple as population? History is full of examples of how quickly a population change can impact a nation or our world! For example, China’s one-child policy is now causing serious implications for an aged society with few children to care for their elders.

Here are 17 population projections that will deeply impact our world in the decades ahead.

  1. By 2017, Baby Boomers will control 70 percent of America’s disposable income.
  2. More than 40 countries are expected to decrease their population between 2015 and 2050.
  3. Older Americans who describe themselves as lonely have a 45 percent greater risk of dying-and that the population of over-65 adults in the United States is projected to double in the next 15 years.
  4. By 2020, the majority of the world’s middle class population will be located in the Asia Pacific region.
  5. In 2035, 60% of the world’s population will be in cities.
  6. By 2035, almost 80% of the world’s population is projected to be in Asia and Africa.
  7. China’s population is expected to be overtaken by India (1.3 billion) within the next seven years.
  8. The collective working-age population of the world’s advanced economies will decline for the first time since 1950.
  9. By 2030, the current urban population of 3.6 billion will rise to five billion.
  10. The urban population of the developing world is expected to double between 2000 and 2030.
  11. Over 85 percent of the world’s population will likely live in a city by the end of the 21st century.
  12. The global rural population is now almost 3.4 billion and expected to decline to 3.2 billion by 2050.
  13. Over the next 40 years, Asia’s urban population is projected to increase from 1.9 billion to 3.2 billion.
  14. By 2030, a billion Chinese people will be city dwellers.
  15. Half the world’s population is expected to be online by 2019.
  16. Up to 2030 the world will need to build the equivalent of a city of 1 million people every five days.
  17. Labor markets will need to add 600 million new jobs by 2026 to accommodate changing global demographics.

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Jeff Suderman is a futurist, consultant, and professor who works in the field of organizational development. He partners with clients to improve culture, leadership, teamwork, organizational alignment, strategy and organizational future-readiness. He resides in Palm Desert, California. Twitter: @jlsuderman Email: jeff@jeffsuderman.com

Source: Shaping Tomorrow

Defining Workplace Generations: Infographic

A common theme in my work relates to the complexities of leading an inter-generational workforce. We use different terms to describe these collections of unique mindsets and values – the younger generation, Gen Y, Gen X and Boomers to name a few. However, sometimes we sling around these terms without fully understanding who they really apply to. Are Gen Y and Millennials synonyms? What do we call those born before Baby Boomers?

A recent article in The Atlantic revealed that much of the confusion about generations is merited because there aren’t definitive terms. Since generations are simply artificial monikers that we use to describe a similar group of people, there is no legal or official version of what years these so-called generations span (with the exception of Baby Boomers – they are the only official generational category used by the US Census Bureau – source: Bump). In fact, most of the definitions we use find their origins in popular media.

However, I have co-created the following chart as a means to provide some common language around this issue. So here are seven generations and their approximate time spans.

Generations with Suderman

While a lot of talk is still focused on Gen Y and Gen Z, I am personally very interested in the generation which will follow them. “Futurist, demographer, and TEDx speaker Mark McCrindle is leading the campaign to call anyone born after 2010 a part of Generation Alpha. According to him, 2.5 million Alphas are born around the globe every week” (Strebenz). Everyone born since 2010 falls into the Alpha category (as will anyone born until 2030).

Effective organizations learn to harness the collective strengths of all the generations they have in their workforce! Contact me if you would like to discuss how to lead lead an increasingly inter-generational workforce!

In an upcoming post I will discuss more details about how different generations impact our workplace. Subscribe to my blog to stay in the loop!


Head ShotJeff Suderman is a futurist, professor, consultant and pracademic who works in the field of organizational development. He works with clients to improve leadership, teamwork, organizational alignment, strategy and organizational Future-Readiness (and he loves great customer service!). He resides in Palm Desert, California. Twitter: @jlsuderman. Email: jeff@jeffsuderman.com

Sources:

Bump, Philip (March 25, 2014). Here Is When Each Generation Begins and Ends, According to Facts. The Atlantic on-line.

McCrindle, Mark (March 22, 2016). Gen Z & Gen Alpha Infographic. The McCrindle Blog on-line.

Strebenz, Christina (Dec. 5, 2015). Here’s who comes after Generation Z — and they’ll be the most transformative age group ever. Business Insider on-line.