What Happens in an Internet Minute?

Most of us acknowledge that the internet has become the hub of our lives. But have you considered what actually happens in an average internet minute? TechSpartan recently answered that question and compared our activities between 2013 and 2014. Here’s what our play (and work!) looks like in 60 seconds:

Internet Minute3

 

 

The March issue of WIRED magazine presented another interesting phenomenon that we are not tracking yet – Internet Minute2screenshots. You have likely observed many conference attendees raise their phones above their head and take screenshots of slides. We also snap photo’s of events, of notes, of texts or things we want to remember later. These screenshots can be both humorous and incriminating and their use is also increasing. This trend is demonstrated by Evernote users who saved 45% more screenshot in their notes than they did a year ago (WIRED).

Some believe that screenshots will help improve productivity and group learning. For example, an individual recently tweeted an article link and received 109 retweets. When he reposted it as a readable screenshot he received over 4,200 tweets (WIRED). So far, the screenshot trend is not occurring through a centralized app but it is plausible that we will see an app claim this market in the upcoming months!

Years ago The Eagles wrote a song about A New York Minute. It appears that even the city that never sleeps can’t even keep up with the internet anymore!


 

Head ShotJeff Suderman is a futurist, professor and consultant who works in the field of organizational development. He works with clients to improve leadership, teamwork, organizational alignment, strategy and organizational Future-Readiness. He resides in Palm Desert, California. Twitter: @jlsuderman

Clive Thompson (March 2015). Screenshot effect: Display your display. Wired Magazine.

 

 

Rules for Living in the Digital Age (According to Wired Magazine)

In the July issue of Wired magazine, they offered up their “Guide to behavior, manners and style” for those of us who live part of our lives on-line. While it was tongue-in-cheek, it provided some great tips that are worthy of sharing in this blog episode. Here are my ten favorites.

10. Yelp is a restaurant review, not an autobiography!

9. Don’t describe yourself as a guru or ninja on LinkedIn unless you read Sanskrit or kill people with throwing stars.

8. No posting ultrasound photos on Facebook.

7. You should favorite compliments you get on Twitter, not reteweet them.

6. Say no to #nofilter tags.

5. Please correct errors in Wikipedia.

4. Don’t follow brands or your followers will get ads.

3. Don’t start your Ted Talk with “so”.

2. During meetings, put your phone on the table, facedown with notifications off.

1. Do not ‘reply all’.


Credits: Wired Magazine (July, 2014). The Code: A Wired guide to behavior, manners and style. Pages 81 – 95.