The Future of Sports – 19 Trends

Today’s blog provides several fascinating insights about the future of sports developed by the Shaping Tomorrow organization. You will find that these upcoming changes are rooted in several key drivers which include shifting demographics (Gen Y), technology invading markets which are not traditionally linked to tech (like sports) as well significant shifts in the economic priority of consumers. So, without further adieu, here they are.

  1. Broadcasts of virtual reality (VR) sports could become the norm.
  2. An estimated 27% of U.S public high schools will not be offering any sports programs by 2020.
  3. E-skin displays could become a direct competition or a replacement for sport watches.
  4. eSports revenues could surpass $1 billion as early as 2018. One Activision exec says it’s a potential Olympic sport.
  5. In the U.S there are more eSports fans than baseball fans and it’s predicted it will exceed any other sport in US.
  6. Millennials are projected to spend about half what all adults in the US and Canada spend ($50) on live sporting events.
  7. Adding sensors to sports equipment will continue to revolutionize the way athletes train and compete.
  8. Body sensor shipments are expected to increase from 2.7 million in 2015 to 68.0 million units annually by 2021.
  9. Parents will increasingly want sports equipment that helps protect their children from injury.
  10. Whoop is the first scientifically-grounded system designed for continuous wear that provides athletes with data to reduce injuries and predict peak performance.
  11. The activewear industry is expected to add $83 billion in sales globally by 2020.
  12. Demand will grow for products and services that help prevent or rehabilitate injuries in growing bodies.
  13. Sports-science insiders have predicted the imminent arrival of gene doping in sports.
  14. Annual smart clothing shipments will grow from 968,000 units in 2015 to 24.8 million units in 2021.
  15. By 2020, global shipments of VR headsets are expected to hit 64.8 million per year.
  16. A new app developed by Scottish start-up Sansible Wearables will let players and coaches track the intensity of a collision and the effect it has on the body.
  17. Similarly, a mouthguard with motion sensors can analyse concussion risks after a player contact.
  18. Rugby could find itself alongside American football as a sport fast losing support among a new generation of parents and young families.
  19. Intelligent robots will publish sports commentaries.

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Jeff Suderman is a futurist, consultant, and professor who works in the field of organizational development. He partners with clients to improve culture, leadership, teamwork, organizational alignment, strategy and organizational future-readiness. He resides in Palm Desert, California. Twitter: @jlsuderman Email: jeff@jeffsuderman.com

Source: Shaping Tomorrow
Photo Credit: Bob Smith

 

Five Leadership Lessons from Muhammad Ali

Last week a modern legend passed away. Cassius Clay, more commonly known as Muhammad Ali, was 74 when he died. Amidst his colorful, quotable, and controversial life, Ali’s story provides some timeless lessons for leaders. Here are five leadership lessons that we can learn from the boxer known as The Champ.

Setbacks Provide New Opportunities: As a 12 year-old, Cassius Clay had his brand new Schwinn bicycle stolen while he attended an event. When he reported it to a local policeman, he was invited to start coming to the gym and a boxer was born. One cannot help but wonder what would have occurred had this theft not occurred! Setbacks are difficult but they can provide leaders with new opportunities.

Your Past Does not Determine Your Future. Ali changed his named, in part, because “Cassius Clay is a slave name – I didn’t choose it and I don’t want it”. He was the grandson of a slave living in the heart of segregated Kentucky and Muhammad Ali wanted to ensure that he defied the odds. As a result, he became one of the most famous athletes in modern history. Like Ali, successful leaders and organizations achieve things which defy circumstances.

Effort is Required. As a teen, Ali jogged his Louisville neighborhood in steel-toed work boots to improve his conditioning. He spent several months training in Zaire prior to the famed ‘Rumble in the Jungle’. As a result of practicing in the heat, he developed a boxing strategy which would conserve energy (known as the‘rope-a-dope’ tactic). This stratagem helped him avoid the fatigue which Foreman encountered and resulted in his win. Like Cassius Clay, effective leaders understand what they are up against and put in the effort required to be great.

Agility Rules. Amongst his many quotable phrases, Ali may be best known for saying, “Float like a butterfly, sting like a bee, your hands can’t hit what your eyes can’t see”. At the heart of this quote is a theme of agility. In fact, two of Ali’s five losses occurred after he came out of retirement – a period when his physical agility was waning (he won 56 matches). Like a boxer, successful organizations must adapt to the many things that are thrown at them and this requires constant agility.

Your Greatest Battles Will Be Unexpected: While ‘The Rumble in the Jungle’ is likely his greatest feat as a boxer, Ali’s greatest battle may have been in the latter years of his life. Since 1981, Ali battled Parkinson’s disease. Effective organizations strategize, work hard and develop agility. However, their greatest challenges will typically come from things they do not see coming.

Cassius Clay/Muhammad Ali

1942-2016


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Jeff Suderman is a futurist, consultant, and professor who works in the field of organizational development. He partners with clients to improve culture, leadership, teamwork, organizational alignment, strategy and organizational future-readiness. He resides in Palm Desert, California. Twitter: @jlsuderman Email: jeff@jeffsuderman.com

Source:

Curwen, Thomas, & Kennedy, J.M. (Sunday, June 5, 2016). Los Angeles Times.